Limping in poker: features of the move

Limping in poker: features of the move

There is an opinion that limping in poker is used by weak players who, with such an action, show not only their low level of skill but also make an erroneous action at the start of the game. In most cases it is, but there are situations when such a move fully justifies itself. Beginning poker players are unlikely to be able to determine such game moments, however, experienced gamers often resort to limping, thus simulating favorable circumstances for themselves.
What is limping in poker
Limping in poker refers to the tactics of a game, the purpose of which is to see the Flop cards as cheap as possible or to force your opponent to invest in the bank.
The essence of this technique is to enter the pre-flop bidding without a raise, that is, making a bet equal to the big blind. Such actions on the part of inexperienced players often turn out to be a mistake, but experienced poker players, who clearly understand when and why they should limp, use this tactical move, anticipating its consequences:
Usually, a single player’s limp is answered by the participant who raised the big blind in order to defend his bet;
Often a limp is a reason for forming a multi-pot, when more than two participants decide to see a flop, since the big blind bet is quite a small waste that you can afford, especially in the early stages of tournaments, until the required stakes have increased;
If a player comes in from a late position, he should expect the same actions from players in the blinds.
Cons of limping
Often limping in poker has negative consequences for the player who applied the technique. They should always be considered before entering the game without a raise. In most cases, the situation will be complicated by the fact that a multi-spot is formed – the game will be accepted by many distribution participants, who will remain to watch the Flop cards in the hope of strengthening the starting hand.
This situation is negatively reflected on the value of pocket cards. Even in the presence of the nut hand, you cannot get a post-flop gain, and lose the hand to an opponent with a weaker starting hand that made up a pair or a set.
The limper should also be worried about the fact that his opponent can have random cards. If none of the participants have raised, you can be sure that the player in the big blind will remain in the hand. Since he can be guided by the desire to protect his compulsory bet, one can never guess with which hand he comes into the confrontation: with a weak one, hoping not to lose his blind or with premium cards, trying to keep his limp post-flop.

Limping in poker is not always an unsuccessful implementation of a move. In some situations, it fully justifies itself, but only experienced poker players can apply this technique correctly.